solar cells panels array monocrystalineI am not quite sure about you, but when was the last time you saw a vacancy in the newspapers that looked for someone whose job was to clean solar panels, and solar panels alone? That does sound rather repetitive and mundane, and there won’t be too much interaction, not to mention it being rather hot assuming you were to work the normal shift hours that most of the other people put in. I guess for stuff like this, it would be far better to engage the services of a robot. After all, robots basically do not tire out (other than requiring its batteries to remain juiced), and neither do business owners have to worry about things like unions, strikes, a salary scale and all that jazz.

Miraikikai Inc. recently unveiled a prototype of what it touts as the world’s first solar panel-cleaning robot, and how does it work? It does not need to make use of water, which is a rather interesting concept, and will more or less run autonomously. Intending to market this particular robot from next year, Miraikikai will aim their focus at the Middle East and Africa, where solar power demand is rising and water being a scarce resource.

Filed in Green >Robots. Source: japantimes.co.jp
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