The obvious answer is the browser itself. But, here, we are not looking to search for the bookmarks inside Google Chrome. Instead, we want to know where the bookmarks are stored on your computer?

This might help you restore/backup/modify your bookmarks locally.

So, for this, we need to locate the exact file (or folder) where Google Chrome saves the bookmarks. The file path will depend on the OS you are running on (Windows, macOS or Linux).

Fret not, in this article, we shall let you know the storage locations of Google Chrome bookmarks on your computer.

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Important Things To Note

Before proceeding to locate the file/folder where Google Chrome bookmarks exist, you should know about a few things (if you were not aware already):

  • You probably do not want to delete or modify the bookmark folder/file unless you are sure that you no longer need it.
  • If you want to copy-paste the file just to transfer the bookmarks onto another PC, you should consider signing in (and syncing) your Google account on Chrome.
  • If you do not have multiple profiles (or multiple users) using the browser, you can easily locate the bookmark folder by spotting the “Default” or “Profile 1” folder in the storage path discussed later in the article.
  • In case multiple users are utilizing Google Chrome, you have to make sure which profile is it (the storage path will differ accordingly). For instance, Profile 2 folder for another user.

Windows: In What Folder Are Google Chrome Bookmarks Stored?

bookmark chrome

Google Chrome bookmarks are stored in a hidden folder on Windows. Here’s how you can locate the bookmarks store:

1. First, you will have to head into your Windows system drive.

2. Once inside, you will notice a “Users” folder. If you are the only user, you can just navigate your way to the folder with your username. For instance, my PC has only one user, so I opened up the folder “ANKUSH” (that’s my system name). In case you have multiple users, you have to decide accordingly.

3. Now, you have to enable the option to view the hidden files. We already have an article on how to view hidden files – if you’re not sure how to do it.

4. Once done, you just have to follow this storage path:

AppData\Local\Google\Chrome\User Data\Profile 1

You might observe the folder as “Default” or “Profile 1/2…” depending on the number of profiles on your Google Chrome browser.

5. Finally, inside this folder, you will find a file “Bookmarks” listed. That’s the file you want.

macOS: In What Folder Are Google Chrome Bookmarks Stored?

On a macOS powered system, locating the bookmark folder is quite similar. Just like we enabled viewing hidden files, you have to enable the option to view hidden files on your macOS.

Once you do that, you just need to navigate your way to the following storage path:

/Users/YOUR USERNAME/Library/Application Support/Google/Chrome/Default

Similar to Windows, you have to explore “Profile 1/2...” folders if you have multiple profiles on your browser.

Inside this storage path, you will find a “Bookmarks” file listed.

Linux: In What Folder Are Google Chrome Bookmarks Stored?

For Linux, it is also quite the same. However, you may have Google Chrome or Chromium (open-source browser on which Google Chrome is based on) installed on Linux. So, accordingly, the folder location might slightly vary.

You will have to navigate your way to potentially two different storage paths:

Google Chrome: /home/YOUR USERNAME/.config/google-chrome/Default/

Chromium: /home/YOUR USERNAME/.config/chromium/Default/

Also, note that the folder can be in the format of “Profile 1/2..” instead of Default.

In addition to the bookmark folder location, if you want to quick tour on how to manage bookmarks in Google Chrome, you may refer the video below:

Wrapping Up

Now that you know the location of where the Google Chrome bookmarks are stored, you should be able to easily restore/backup or delete the bookmarks file from your computer.

If you face any issues following the answer suggested above, let us know in the comments.

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